Logitech BRIO

The Logitech BRIO rises to the top of the pile, with a standout feature list that others just can't match right now. If you're hunting for the very best, then this is the one to get.

Our pick

Logitech BRIO

If you really want your webcam video to look its best, Logitech's new BRIO is the one for you. It was the first webcam to hit the market with support for 4K video, meaning super-crisp footage in apps that support it. It's also pretty well-rounded, with a neat background replacement feature and support for the important Windows Hello security features in Windows 10.

Who should buy this webcam?

While 4K video is probably overkill for conference calls, creators like YouTubers and streamers, in particular, will get the absolute best footage from this webcam.

Is it a good time to buy this webcam?

Definitely. Even though the BRIO has been on the market for a little while, it's unlikely to be replaced by anything better in the near future.

Reasons to buy

  • 4K video.
  • HDR.
  • Supports Windows Hello.
  • Privacy shutter.

Reasons not to buy

  • Quite expensive.
  • Overkill for many purposes.

Why the Logitech BRIO is the best webcam for Windows

Do you really need a 4K webcam right now? Probably not, but that doesn't make the BRIO any less impressive. If your needs stretch to the highest quality video, then it has to be top of your list.

There's nothing else out there right now quite like it.

But besides 4K, the BRIO ticks about every box you'd want from a webcam. Streamers will love the integrated background replacement feature. Everyone will love that it supports Windows Hello, and the more security conscious will appreciate the privacy shutter.

You're also getting HDR, so the video quality isn't just limited to resolution. It's not the cheapest webcam, but there's nothing else out there right now quite like it.

Alternatives to the Logitech BRIO

The BRIO might be the very best, but there are plenty of other great alternatives that may cater to more specific needs and tighter budgets.

Best mid-range

Logitech C922

The Logitech C922 records crisp 1080p video that can be saved for later viewing, uploaded to YouTube, or sent to a friend. Improved from its predecessor, the C920, the new version also does 720p video at 60 frames per second (FPS).

Dual microphones pick up your voice rather than the ambient sound around you. A strong mounting clip keeps the webcam in place, or you can use the included mini tripod. The party piece is the smart background removal software that comes with it to act as a virtual green screen. Perfect for streamers without the budget or the space for a real one.

Best entry-level

Microsoft LifeCam HD3000

Entry level doesn't have to mean horrid, low-resolution video. Microsoft's LifeCam HD 3000 is an excellent choice at a rock-bottom price that still offers HD 720p video in 16:9 for a more "cinematic" feel to your videos.

The TrueColor technology will also ensure things stay bright and colorful. The LifeCam HD 3000 is great for use with laptops, as well as desktops, and its universal base allows you to use it alongside virtually any PC with ease.

Best for Hello

LilBit Face Recognition Camera

This camera has a pretty generic design that's used by a number of brands, but more importantly, it has 3D capabilities that make it fully compatible with Windows Hello.

It won't break any records for video quality since you're limited to 720p, but the price of $75 offsets that shortcoming a little. It promises one-second recognition for fast access to your PC, as well as having multi-user support for a shared computer. Everyone can then log in to their own accounts with ease.

Best for streamers

Razer Kiyo

The Kiyo is part of Razer's streamer certified range and it has one very important feature: A big ring light on the front. For streamers short on space for lighting, the Kiyo can solve the issue of being seen while you're broadcasting, with a simple twist adjusting the brightness.

The image quality itself is pretty good, too, with a nice contrast and decent sharpness, and it can record in 1080p at 30FPS or at 60FPS if you drop the resolution to 720p. There's also a standard tripod mount on the bottom if you'd rather not mount it to a monitor.

Credits — The team that worked on this guide

Richard Devine is a Reviews Editor at Windows Central. You'll usually find him deep in hardware, gaming, both or drinking root beer for which he openly has a mild addiction.

Daniel Rubino is executive editor of Windows Central. He has been covering Microsoft since 2009 back when this site was called WMExperts (and later Windows Phone Central). His interests include Windows, Surface, HoloLens, Xbox, and future computing visions. Follow him on Twitter: @daniel_rubino.

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