'InPrivate Desktop' security feature will let Windows 10 sandbox untrusted software

Microsoft this week let sleep an interesting new security feature it is cooking up for Windows 10. Called "InPrivate Desktop," the feature was initially spotted in a now-removed Feedback Hub quest for Insiders by Bleeping Computer (via ZDNet), and it's described as a type of "throwaway sandbox" for testing untrusted software.

With InPrivate Desktop, users would be able to quickly launch a one-time sandboxed virtual machine that would let them test a piece of software without worrying about it potentially impacting system files. As Microsoft described in the Feedback Hub post:

InPrivate Desktop (Preview) provides admins a way to launch a throwaway sandbox for secure, one-time execution of untrusted software. This is basically an in-box, speedy VM that is recycled when you close the app!

InPrivate Desktop Quest Image: Bleeping Computer

Outside of a basic description, Microsoft also listed the prerequisites for running the app, indicating that it is destined for Windows 10 Enterprise on build 17718 or later. The app will also require at least 4GB of RAM, at least 5GB of free disk space, and at least two CPU cores.

Further, the description links to a wiki page referencing "Madrid_Self-Host," possibly indicating the app's internal codename is "Madrid." Unfortunately, the wiki page requires sign-in with a validated Microsoft account to access its contents.

According to Bleeping Computer, the InPrivate Desktop app was inaccessible from the Microsoft Store even while the Insider quest was live in Feedback Hub. Still, it gives us a peek at what could turn out to be an interesting and valuable feature for system administrators looking to quickly test out untrusted software.